Early Cocky (AKA Cocke) Emigrates To Virginia


In seventeenth Century Henrico County, Virginia’s most powerful families were the Randolphs, Cockes, Eppses, and Byrds. Research shows them all among my ancestors.   In fact, Lieutenant Colonel Richard Cocke (13 Dec.1597- 4 Oct 1665), was my paternal 10th great-grandfather. He was a graduate of Caius (sounds like “keys”) College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England. … Continue reading Early Cocky (AKA Cocke) Emigrates To Virginia

Wild Times in “The Wilderness” of Spotsylvania


My paternal great grandfather was Edward "Bud" Vincent Bowling/Boling (1872-1946). He was born in Parker, Spotsylvania County, Virginia. According to the 1880 Census, "Vincent," as he was called at eight years old, lived on a tenant farm with his father Lawrence T. Boling (42), and his mother Sara Elizabeth Bettie Tapp (45), and his sisters … Continue reading Wild Times in “The Wilderness” of Spotsylvania

The Battle of Wilderness Farm – May 5-7, 1864


Many of my paternal ancestors lived in Spotsylvania County and, in fact, on the Wilderness Farm (my 2nd great-grandmother "Bettie Tapp [1834-1900] who married Lawrence T. Boling [1838-1910]). The following video is tailer from the new 3-part mini series on the History Channel about the Civil War Battle of Wilderness Farm [May 5-7, 1864], then … Continue reading The Battle of Wilderness Farm – May 5-7, 1864

“Tapp-ing” Into Lives in 19th Century Spotsylvania County


Local author, Pat Sullivan, penned and published the post that follows on Saturday, September 2014.  It is a far more intimate story of Phenie Tapp's (my second great aunt) family than my post "Bi-racial Relationships of the 60’s–the 1860’s!", penned May 14, 2014. My post tells about my second great-grandmother Catharine Elizabeth "Widow Tapp" Dempsey (descendent … Continue reading “Tapp-ing” Into Lives in 19th Century Spotsylvania County

The Killing Spree . . . Our Ancestral Legacy


Attributing our traits to our ancestors Some days when I look at myself in the mirror, I can see glimpses of my ancestors. My once beautifully brilliant blue eyes; I remember seeing these same eyes in my maternal grandfather, Roy (a Ford from Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina).  Unfortunately, I also get my thick midriff from either or both--my … Continue reading The Killing Spree . . . Our Ancestral Legacy

Mapping the Spread of American Slavery


Lincoln Mullen is an assistant professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University, working on the history of American religions as a digital historian. He writes regularly on his own blog and for the Religion in American History group blog.  He also teaches a course on “Data and Visualization in Digital History” where … Continue reading Mapping the Spread of American Slavery

There’s Nothing Civil About War


General Robert E. Lee, the Man... Descended from several of Virginia's First Families, General Robert E. Lee was a well-regarded officer of the United States Army before the American Civil War. Born in 1807 to Revolutionary War hero Henry "Light-Horse Harry" Lee in Stratford Hall, Virginia, Robert Edward Lee seemed destined for military greatness. His decision … Continue reading There’s Nothing Civil About War

157 Years Later: CSA Sgt. Gideon W. Morris–Our “Battle of Antietam” Survivor


Freshly Fallen Bricks of My Morris Family Wall After searching to uncover more information about my maternal great grandmother's (Mary Susan MORRIS Ford) family, I once again stumbled and fell upon freshly fallen bricks of a wall I had pushed against for many years.  Until now, I primarily had focused on the origins of my Native American heritage through the Morris branch.  And then, … Continue reading 157 Years Later: CSA Sgt. Gideon W. Morris–Our “Battle of Antietam” Survivor

FORESTVILLE–1700′s to 1900′s


Tucked away in the basement of the Greenbelt Public Library in the old town of Greenbelt on 11 Crescent Avenue, is a single room packed to the brim with historical information within the collections of the Frederick S. DeMarr Library of County History. It was here, among the many shelves of old documents, books, maps, newspapers, and … Continue reading FORESTVILLE–1700′s to 1900′s

Archeologists Unearth 40 Confederate Corpses in Virginia Cemetery 154 Years Later


Like you probably, I often come across stories quite by accident that just scream out at me; "share me with other genealogical researchers!" This is another one of those finds.  Interestingly enough, this FOX NEWS story appeared on the United Kingdom's Mail OnLine News.  I'm very sorry that I found it two weeks after our Memorial Day Observances, but … Continue reading Archeologists Unearth 40 Confederate Corpses in Virginia Cemetery 154 Years Later

Remembering Loved Ones for Their Military Services


Home of the Brave About 1-1/2 years ago, I wrote a blog post From Everyday Moments May Come Precious Memories where I noted my feelings, ties, and respect for my mom's grandfather, John Carpenter Ford; her parents, Robert Gideon and Loretta Ford; and her brother, my uncle, John Austin Ford.  The Ford family was intricately involved with me in … Continue reading Remembering Loved Ones for Their Military Services

Bi-racial Relationships of the 60’s–the 1860’s!


The Year 1868 Last week my genealogical research took me back to my second paternal great-grandfather, Lawrence T. "Larl" Boling.  I already knew that Larl married Sarah Elizabeth "Bettie" Tapp in Fredericksburg, Virginia, but when I looked more closely I found that their wedding took place just one week before Christmas 1868--that was the Christmas day when our … Continue reading Bi-racial Relationships of the 60’s–the 1860’s!

150th Anniversary–Battle of the Wilderness


My second great-grandfather, Lawrence T. "Larl" Boling married Sarah Tapp, daughter of the now famous Catharine Dempsey "Widow Tapp," (making her my 3rd great grandmother) because she had the misfortune of living on the land that became known as the "Wilderness Battlefield," in Fredericksburg, Virginia, during the Civil War. On Friday, May 2, through Sunday, May … Continue reading 150th Anniversary–Battle of the Wilderness

…Back to Ole’ Virginny


Although we are officially two weeks into the 2013 Fall Season today (October 3), it is yet another day in a string of unseasonably warm ones with brilliant blue skies, bright sunshine, blossoming flowers, mostly green trees, and temperatures rising again into the mid-80's.  What an opportunity to  'Saisir le jour,' as the French would … Continue reading …Back to Ole’ Virginny

The Taylor’s of Culpeper, Virginia (1877-1945)


William Frazier TAYLOR, Jr. William Frazier Taylor, Jr., was my great grand uncle and brother to my paternal great-grandmother, Lottie L. Taylor Chambers. (It's uncanny, my brother John's son, Matthew Burton Boling, four generations later, is the spitting image of William as he appeared in the image on the left.) When William was born on … Continue reading The Taylor’s of Culpeper, Virginia (1877-1945)

A Remembering People


Many of my paternal ancestors lived in and around the Chancellorsville Battlefield in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. My great-grandparents, and other family members, in fact, are buried in a small church cemetery on Ely's Ford Road. So these people and events are very near and dear to me. Fredericksburg Remembered Musings on history, public history, and … Continue reading A Remembering People

THANKFUL THURSDAY: The Best Things In Life Are Free – Part 1


The best things in life are free, especially the gifts of our ancestors whose trailblazing contributions started first in the colony of Virginia (Jamestown, 1607) and then in Plymouth (1620) over 400 years ago. These settlers from England, Wales, Scotland, Holland, and Ireland bonded together to form our religious, social, business and industry, government, education, … Continue reading THANKFUL THURSDAY: The Best Things In Life Are Free – Part 1