Back From the Future – Part 2


 A Quote from the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, June 2014: Christopher Columbus never reached the shores of the North American Continent, but European explorers learned three things from him: there was someplace to go, there was a way to get there, and most importantly, there was a way to get back. Thus began the European exploration of … Continue reading Back From the Future – Part 2

Following in the Footsteps of Hawthorne, Melville, and Thoreau?


This post is dedicated to our family's radiant and clear-sighted history lover, hiker, and nature lover, Mrs. Corrie Priola Dickinson--our eldest grandson Joe's bride of 18 months.  We don't get to see them much these days because they are stationed in Monterey, California, but we think of them daily and wonder what great adventures they … Continue reading Following in the Footsteps of Hawthorne, Melville, and Thoreau?

The Lee’s–a Historically Significant Virginia and Maryland Political Family


Colonial America and Prominent Lee Family Members Many prominent members of the Lee Family are known for their accomplishments in politics and the military.  This family first became prominent in Colonial America when Richard Henry Lee I arrived in Virginia in 1639 and went on to become possibly the richest man in Virginia by the time … Continue reading The Lee’s–a Historically Significant Virginia and Maryland Political Family

“It Shines Like Liquid Gold–Sparkles Like Amber Dew”


Many of the men in our family in their younger days were beer drinkers.  Today, not so much.  In fact, at our family gatherings for the past 30 years we have had only non-alcoholic beverages. The Beginning of My Family's Beer Drinking Days My dad was an attractive but scrawny child, who in 1949, three years after … Continue reading “It Shines Like Liquid Gold–Sparkles Like Amber Dew”

Honoring our Family’s King–from Car Park to Cathedral


Over Two Years Earlier... This writing follows up on my post in February 2013 about my Royal and sometimes controversial Plantagenet family and whether I would choose to claim them.  That article was sparked by the forensic archaeological discovery of King Richard III‘s remains under a parking lot in the English city of Leicester.  Now, 25 months later, all the forensic studies have … Continue reading Honoring our Family’s King–from Car Park to Cathedral

Historically and Genetically Speaking, I Guess I’m Naturally Frank


My dad's name is Frank.  I wonder from whom/where his name came?   One such theory comes from the  Merovingian dynasty where "Frankish" kings ruled a frequently fluctuating area in parts of present-day France and Germany from the 5th to the 8th century AD. They were sometimes called the "long-haired kings" by contemporaries, for their leaders' … Continue reading Historically and Genetically Speaking, I Guess I’m Naturally Frank

Native Americans, White People, and Scottish-Irish Emigrate to North Carolina


Native Americans A recent blog post focused on my maternal great-grandmother Mary Susan MORRIS's family--our Native American heritage through the Morris branch--and the freshly fallen bricks of a wall I had been up against for years. White People Not abandoning this wall, but continuing on, I returned to my maternal great-grandfather--Grandmother Susan's husband, John Carpenter Ford's (1864-1961) family. Similarly, I found … Continue reading Native Americans, White People, and Scottish-Irish Emigrate to North Carolina

Our Native American Heritage–A Follow On


 My post just a few days ago focused on our Native American heritage and the tribes who resided along the borders of the Chesapeake Bay. In my April 24, 2014, and December 3, 2012, posts we looked at our paternal Pocahontas ancestry--First Lady Edith Bolling Galt Wilson (my third cousin), and our lineage to Pocahontas … Continue reading Our Native American Heritage–A Follow On

The Chesapeake Bay and Our Native American Heritage


This post focuses on our Native American heritage who resided along the borders of the Chesapeake Bay.  Digressing just a little into my lineage, my paternal Bolling ancestors were among the first in Jamestown and my maternal Lathrop ancestors the first in New England.  My ninth great-grandfather, Colonel Robert Bolling married Pocahontas' granddaughter, Jane Poythress … Continue reading The Chesapeake Bay and Our Native American Heritage

The Robin Williams – A Fellow Baby Boomer


Like so many others my emotions flew from disbelief to sadness, to a true sense of personal loss--almost as though he were a greatly loved family member.  We were fellow baby boomers who experienced some of the most incredible and incredulous moments in life on this planet.  No disrespect intended, Robin had been a part of … Continue reading The Robin Williams – A Fellow Baby Boomer

Firefighting in Colonial America


Introduction As some of my blog readers may know, my husband, Bob, has been a firefighter for nearly 25 years and his dedication to community goes back as long as I can remember.  Today, he serves as Chief of a local county volunteer fire department.  With so much of his time devoted to and around the … Continue reading Firefighting in Colonial America

Bi-racial Relationships of the 60’s–the 1860’s!


The Year 1868 Last week my genealogical research took me back to my second paternal great-grandfather, Lawrence T. "Larl" Boling.  I already knew that Larl married Sarah Elizabeth "Bettie" Tapp in Fredericksburg, Virginia, but when I looked more closely I found that their wedding took place just one week before Christmas 1868--that was the Christmas day when our … Continue reading Bi-racial Relationships of the 60’s–the 1860’s!

1914: My 3rd Cousin’s Husband Proclaimed Mother’s Day a National Holiday


A Presidential Proclamation On May 9, 1914, President Woodrow Wilson (husband of my third cousin, Edith Bolling Wilson), issued a presidential proclamation that officially established the first national Mother's Day holiday to celebrate America's mothers. But, there are two lines of thought about where and when the idea of Mother's Day was first brought up. Julia Ward Howe 1) … Continue reading 1914: My 3rd Cousin’s Husband Proclaimed Mother’s Day a National Holiday

Two Pocahontas Descendants Became First Ladies


A wonderful post dated July 12, 2013 on the Edith Bolling Wilson Museum's Facebook Page that includes many wonderful short snippets about Edith, her life, and museum artifacts, pictures, and events in Wytheville, Virginia was all the prompting I needed to adapt and expand it. Pocahontas and Edith Bolling Wilson... Strong Women and Role Models for … Continue reading Two Pocahontas Descendants Became First Ladies

150th Anniversary–Battle of the Wilderness


My second great-grandfather, Lawrence T. "Larl" Boling married Sarah Tapp, daughter of the now famous Catharine Dempsey "Widow Tapp," (making her my 3rd great grandmother) because she had the misfortune of living on the land that became known as the "Wilderness Battlefield," in Fredericksburg, Virginia, during the Civil War. On Friday, May 2, through Sunday, May … Continue reading 150th Anniversary–Battle of the Wilderness

ISO my Family’s Sociological “Big Bang!”


According to my most recent research into the Bolling-Chambers-Taylor families, I am descended from an ancient line of folks who were known to be bald, short, fat, stammerers, and some even barbarians! At my eldest grandson's wedding in Chicago last weekend,  my third eldest grandson approached me for genealogical help. For his college sociology class, his assignment … Continue reading ISO my Family’s Sociological “Big Bang!”

Remembering a 19th Century Educator…


My Paternal 2nd Cousin--5 times removed, from Linden, Amelia County, Virginia Anna Peyton Bolling (1836-1919) was born 177 years ago. At that time, her father, John Peyton Bolling, was 48 and her mother, Anne Field Gilliam, was 40.  Anna was the sixth of seven children born to Petersburg, Virginia farmers.  Anna had six siblings, namely: Mary … Continue reading Remembering a 19th Century Educator…

ISO Family Athletes and Olympians


Origin of the Olympic Games The Olympic Games began in ancient Greece about 3,000 years ago.   From the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D., the Games were held every four years in Olympia, in Southern Greece's western peninsula, Peloponnese.  The Games honored the Greek God Zeus, who was the god of the sky and ruler of … Continue reading ISO Family Athletes and Olympians

More Perspectives Into Our Southern Ancestry


Since its founding in 1845, the New England Historic Genealogical Society has been helping its members to research, record, and tell their own unique family stories. The following story was published in the American Ancestor Magazine in April 1986 and lends yet another perspective into my southern ancestry.  I have added some sketches, pictures, maps, … Continue reading More Perspectives Into Our Southern Ancestry

Mother of the Modern Hospice Movement: Rose Hawthorne Lathrop/Mother Mary Alphonsa


Here's yet another story of our Lathrop family lineage that adds to our long and growing list of notables... It further exhibits their societal/cultural status as well as their talents and gifts for writing, painting, illustrating, and their lifelong philanthropic dedication and commitment. Rose Hawthorne Founder of the Servants of Relief for Incurable Cancer (1851-1926) … Continue reading Mother of the Modern Hospice Movement: Rose Hawthorne Lathrop/Mother Mary Alphonsa